What has golf to do with dancing?

See below the instruction for “How to swing a Golf club” and find the similarities in dancing! Think about a reverse (left) turn in Viennese Waltz.

  1. Nothing beats going back to basics. For your body to move as freely as possible, you have to start in balance. Your weight should be in the middles of your feet, both left to right and back to front. Try this three-step routine: (1) Push your hips back, (2) angle your spine toward the ball and (3) flex your knees slightly. Steps 1 and 2 set good posture; Step 3 helps stability. Also, make sure your right side is lower than your left, the ball is in line with the left side of your face (for a middle iron), and the clubface is looking at the target. The back of your shoulder, kneecap and the ball of your foot should line up vertically. A bowler sets up in balance — hips back, torso forward, knees bent — and doesn’t have to re-balance to move.
  2. The various parts of the swing should start back in this order: clubhead, hands, arms, shoulders, hips. Your right arm should stay close to your right side, so don’t force a straight-back takeaway. As the hands pass the right leg, weight should start shifting to the right. When the club reaches parallel to the ground, it should also be parallel to the target line — that shows the club is swinging on the correct arc. The clubface at that point should be toe up, making it square to the swing arc.
  3. The various parts of the swing should start back in this order: clubhead, hands, arms, shoulders, hips. Your right arm should stay close to your right side, so don’t force a straight-back takeaway. As the hands pass the right leg, weight should start shifting to the right. When the club reaches parallel to the ground, it should also be parallel to the target line — that shows the club is swinging on the correct arc. The clubface at that point should be toe up, making it square to the swing arc.
  4. Lead with lower body. The downswing begins with a slight lateral shift, moving the left knee and hip over the left foot. This forward movement causes the arms to drop, returning the right elbow into a position in front of the right hip. Your belt buckle should point at the ball, but your shoulders should still be closed to the target. The forward shift happens with the lower body — your head stays behind the ball. Resist the urge to throw the club from the top, maintaining your wrist hinge as you start down.
  5. Follow through: extend and rotate. Both arms are fully extended, and the right shoulder is down, not turning level with the left. Although straight, your arms should be starting to swing back to the inside; they point down the line for a split second before turning inside. Your right knee should be kicking inward, closing the gap with your left knee, and your left leg should be straight, providing a firm brace to hit against. The clubhead is still below your hands, proving the wrists have not flipped to help the ball into the air.
  6. Keep right side moving: The right side has rotated past the left so the right shoulder is the part of the body closest to the target. Momentum has carried the hands behind the head, and the arms are soft and folded. Check these key positions: Your right foot is up on its toes, your body weight has fully transferred into your left heel, and your belt buckle points at or left of the target. Your shoulders should have turned more than your hips, indicating a full upper-body release. You should be comfortably balanced, as you were at address.